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George Washington – The Man

 Swaying away in the universe of great personalities, people often forget that underneath the important role they had in society or history, there lies a life and a personal history, which is subject to both success and failure.

All the years that George Washington was turned into an extremely inspiring idol, cold and lifeless, a withering man looking at us from a dollar bill. However, who is the flesh and blood man beyond that image and what traits in his personal life would predict his major role in history?

Rejected as a British officer at the age of 24, by age 42 the once loyal British man had become Britain’s most fearful enemy. Washington risked everything to lead his nation against all odds, struggling for independence. The young Washington was born in a modest farmhouse in the county Virginia, in 1732. 

 

 

Source: https://pixabay.com/en/monument-mountain-mount-rushmore-2228305/

George Washington –How Childhood Influenced Him

 Seeing a model in his older brother, who was a cultivated and rich man living between 1718 and 1752, George Washington’s following years were attentively guided by him, who would take the place of George’s father. He aspired to his brother’s high education in England by reading books of social manners, English newspapers, and magazines, Roman classics, in the hope that he’d become one of the elite and would be able to attend the dinner parties together with his brother.

 Born and educated within the Virginia culture and lifestyle, where land was the most valuable commodity in society, George Washington bought his first piece of land at the age of 18. Carefully climbing the social ladder, he soon became an officer and was enrolled in his first military campaign. A small war between England and France, fuelled by inflicted land claims between the two continents, also called the 7 Years War in Europe, was one of George’s first missions to train civilians for war. However, he had neither the skills nor the knowledge he was expected to teach but he rapidly made up for his lack of practical experience by learning from books and making up the rest as he went along at the time.

Source: https://pixabay.com/en/money-dollar-bill-paper-one-dollar-1273908/

The First Military Steps of George Washington

 The following years of his military practice were marked by the formation of George’s personality, both as a man and as a leader. The striking trait that kept him alive and helped him gain his superiors’ trust and admiration was the fact that he was making up for his lack in strategic attack with his bravery.

 When he realized that he could never be a British officer, as he had always dreamt of, he resigned because of the denial in advancement for the British army that he was rudely offered. He also understood that if he wanted to leave a mark on the world, he would need to do it as a civilian.

 George’s life would be bound to take a turn at the moment since, after his brother’s death, he was left with the entire farm and property. He then married Martha Custis, one of the richest women in Virginia at that time, making sure in this way to enter the Elite circles he admired so much.

Source: https://pixabay.com/en/usa-america-constitution-signing-1779925/

The Importance of George Washington to America’s History

 Being a firm believer in America’s independent economy and contributing highly to realizing this, Washington began to see advantages in the political independence as well. After being sent as Virginia’s representative to the first continental congress in Philadelphia several times, George Washington was appointed a commander in chief of the Army, which would pave the way for the National Independence, as his election was unanimous.


 

The choice of Washington was mainly supported by the fact that he already had led a great troop of people in the French and Indian wars and he also had the war experience and the legislation. Historians often say that part of the greatness of Washington lies in those things he did not do. He could have made himself king or president for life, as he was incredibly popular, however, he chose to believe in the president’s responsibility to the citizens. At the times America was most vulnerable, his leadership capabilities and political principles were just what was needed.